Christine

2016

Biography / Drama

28
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 88%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 76%
IMDb Rating 7 10 7583

Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
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March 06, 2017 at 05:43 AM

Director

Cast

Rebecca Hall as Christine
Michael C. Hall as George
Maria Dizzia as Jean
720p 1080p
866.08 MB
1280*720
English
R
23.976 fps
1hr 59 min
P/S 3 / 56
1.8 GB
1920*1080
English
R
23.976 fps
1hr 59 min
P/S 0 / 35

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by MisterWhiplash 10 / 10

Harrowing with a capital H. One of the great character studies in years

Christine, one of the best films I've seen this year, might appear at first to be about a feminist issue - set in 1974 at a small TV station in Sarasota, Florida, a woman named Christine Lubbock (Rebecca Hall) has to contend with her male co-workers and male boss, and where they get preferential treatment (at least seemingly, ultimately) despite being told by her own boss she's the smartest on there - but it's strongest as a depiction of mental illness. This is the subject that actually makes for more compelling subject matter, though it is harsher to see depicted; I cringe watching this film, it's uncomfortable to watch, and despite/because of this it's a brilliant depiction of a bi-polar person and the interior struggle of her life.

There are two fronts this film is successful. The first is the technical aspect. This looks, feels, acted, sounds like a movie from the period in the 70's (you know, back when American cinema was king as far as getting deeper into character and mood and technique and showing a reality moviegoers hadn't been exposed to much before outside of foreign cinema) with Campos and his DP using zoom lenses and shots that linger maybe just a little too long, and audio that sometimes (no, often times) can put us into the state of mind of the character: when Christine is laser-focused, nothing else can detract from her. When she is wary, she may hear the sounds outside that make her a little distracted (there's one scene between Christine and George, played by Michael C Hall, in a car that made me see/hear this). Not to mention the clothes, the music (so much bad 70's pop on the precipice of disco), and how people talked to one another.

The other thing that makes it authentic is how Christine and everyone talks, The dialog here is all about showing the realism of the TV station, and finding the nuance and what surrounds this woman who is very smart. It could be said she has a touch of Asperger's along with the bi-polar, if one wanted to go into a diagnosing-on-the-couch approach. But that takes away from what Campos and Rebecca Hall accomplish with this character. One may be reminded of Nightcrawler from two years ago, also about an ambitious being in the world of news (also, one should say, with a mental or personality disorder of some kind, and access to a police radio for the latest scoop), only while Gyllenhall in that film was a pure sociopath and no lack of communicating what he thinks/feels/sees, Christine's problems are an inability to come out with something all the time.

To be sure she's surrounded by the kind of news culture that has only multiplied exponentially over the past four decades; "If it bleeds, it leads," Christine's boss says, to which Christine reminds him that's a BS catch-phrase. No matter: the pressure is on to get things that people want to see, that brings ratings, and the same "human interest" stories about locals with Strawberry farms or chicken coops won't cut it. But what drew me in to this film was how potent the point of view was for Christine in this world. It's hinted at (or flat out spoken) that she had some previous anxiety/personality/bi-polar disorder issues back in Boston where she used to work, and now being in Sarasota isn't being much of an improvement. So among this news team, where she tries to find her own path and is up against resistance (some understandable, some not), and with friends (Maria Dizza as Jean is as good a supporting performance as from Michael C Hall, and he's really great here), she makes her own problems but never in a way that makes her unsympathetic.

Christine is closer if anything to Taxi Driver as far as a story of someone on the edge of an existence, and it's all the more painful because of what Christine is able and ready to do, her talents and intuition and in her way mix of innocence and cynicism (though mostly disbelief) at the world around her, which includes her own pot-smoking hippie mother. Hall taps into the ball of contradictions in this character, and I was often on the edge of my seat like this was the most intense thriller in years.

And it's in fact all based on a true story; I had known a couple of the broad strokes of the story, the climax in particular, and I almost wish I hadn't. I won't mention what happens to the sometimes awkward, full articulate but "not easy to approach" (as George says to her at one point) Christine by the end of her story, but even knowing it the filmmakers and Hall draw us in so inexorably to her interior and exterior struggles through such precise and heartbreaking storytelling that I can't shake the feeling this will be with me for a while.

Reviewed by paul_a_salt 8 / 10

A moving film about depression with a fantastic lead role

I'm going to write this review as if you had not heard the sensational and tragic story of Christine Chubbuck. If you are unfamiliar with Christine's story then I suggest you do not read into it before seeing this film. I shall reveal very little of it here.

The story concerns the real life story of Christine Chubbuck, a reporter in Florida in the 1970s. As an opportunity opens up at a bigger news station, Christine finds herself attempting to adopt the station manager's sensationalist approach to the news. The film details her struggle with depression and it's impact on her personal life and work.

The depression is seen as both the result and cause of Christine 's difficulty in connecting with others. Many characters throughout the film reach out to her only for her to pull away. The cyclical nature of depression is all too familiar but what's interesting here is that each character who reaches out to Christine is well meaning but insist on viewing her depression in their own way instead of actually speaking with Christine.

At one point Christine screams "why is no one listening to me?!" and it's true. No one listens to Christine. Her mother is certain that she just needs a man. The anchor on her news show is certain she just needs therapy. Her friend at the station is certain that she just needs ice cream. Everyone is so quick to offer possible remedies and solutions that Christine is actually overlooked.

This is exemplified in the "Yes, but" game as seen in the trailer for the film. In the game the speaker tells the listener their problems. The listener then suggests a solution to which the speaker replies "yes, but" and points out the issues with that solution. The idea may be to get to the heart of the speaker's problems or for them to simply run out of problems and start thinking about solutions but the effect is clear. The issues and concerns of the speaker are being dismissed, one by one. Often with just a few words.

This portrayal of the isolating effects of depression is very affecting. We see Christine attempt to bury herself in work, buying a radio scanner to listen in on police frequencies in an attempt to find the gruesome story she needs to gain recognition. As we see her hunched over her notepad listening to two police officers brag about sexual conquests, we can see the cracks starting to appear.

The entire film hinges on Rebecca Hall's ability to play a character who is simultaneously spiralling out of control and deeply sympathetic and fortunately she accomplishes this extremely well. She is magnetic to watch even as she shrinks into the backgrounds of the scenes in which Christine finds herself. Her awkwardness and frustration are told through tiny movements and gestures.

The film takes some liberties with the real life of Christine Chubbuck. Some people on her life have been omitted and some incidents have been made to occur later than they actually did for dramatic effect. However if you walk into this film without knowing how Christine's story ended then I am sure you will be as shocked as the world was back in 1975 and hopefully you will reflect on how you personally react to depression, in yourself and others. If you're anything like me you will emerge from the cinema desperate to know more about this enigmatic and tragic young woman.

The film is a very tense and uncomfortable slow burn with some surprisingly funny moments. Performances are excellent all round but this really is Hall's show and is an excellent showcase for her talents as a screen presence.

Reviewed by A_Different_Drummer 8 / 10

Not a simple review

Let's start with a truism.

Simple reviews are for simple films. This is not a simple film.

On the one hand, you have a drama based on a true story of a reporter in the 70s who had a nervous breakdown and ultimately self-destructed.

Films with "known" endings are always a challenge because, you have to ask, what is there to hold the attention of the viewer if you already know what happens? Here we have an answer: to hold the attention, we have Rebecca Hall's best-ever performance of her already-solid career. Dressed down, no makeup, she not only disguises her natural beauty (clearly seen in other films she has starred in) but actually creates a character that simultaneously engages and horrifies the viewer at the same time.

Her portrayal of real-life reporter Christine Chubbuck is not unlike one of those "suspense" films about a time-bomb that needs to be defused before it explodes and takes an entire building with it. The manic energy Hall builds is a show-stopper and one cannot avoid the prediction that this performance will be noticed, and honored, down the road.

On an entirely different level, however, director Antonio Campos never misses an opportunity to paint this story against a broader canvas, a canvas that is as appropriate to the events of today -- this review written on the eve of the Trump inauguration -- as it was during the 70s, when incoming president Ford "pardoned" outgoing president Nixon.

Campos achieves this by clever edits and inserts, the selection of a specific sound bite here, the choice of a special movie Chubbuck watches by herself there (for example, Christine on her free time chooses to watch Carnival of Souls 1962, a film about a heroine who goes quietly insane because she is not sure about who she actually is.) The fact is that the news media is no better today than it was then, and likely much worse. Years ago, MAD MAGAZINE did a satire on the NYT's motto "all the news that's fit to print," re-imagining it as "all the news that fits, we print." An argument can be made that the west's news services (90% of which are owned by only six corporations in 2017) are merely glorified ad agencies. At best, they are pushing endorphins. At worst (check out the 2016 scandal over the DNC) they are pushing ideas into people's heads that are partial and biased.

If Ms. Chubbuck were alive today, one doubts if she would be any more pleased with the job she so desperately tried to perform.

Highly recommended.

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