Phoenix Forgotten

2017

Horror / Mystery / Sci-Fi / Thriller

33
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Rotten 40%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Spilled 49%
IMDb Rating 5.2 10 2073

Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
Downloaded 132,916 times
July 24, 2017 at 12:21 AM

Director

Cast

Mackenzie Firgens as Newscaster
720p 1080p
631.57 MB
1280*720
English
PG-13
23.976 fps
1hr 27 min
P/S 42 / 274
1.31 GB
1920*1080
English
PG-13
23.976 fps
1hr 27 min
P/S 48 / 244

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by gatheringsnow 5 / 10

Just get on with it already!

Those words are what I was literally screaming in my head beginning about a half an hour into the film, as the first act of the movie went on and on with all these unnecessary and drawn-out interviews with the family members and friends of the three teenagers who went missing back in 97' after the Phoenix Lights incident in Phoenix, Arizona. I honestly felt like I was watching a faux documentary on the film, perhaps something to watch in the special features section of the DVD when it comes out, but it made up over half of the movie!

The sad thing, this film had a lot of promise and potential, and so much of it was squandered in the end. The Phoenix Lights, unlike The Blair Witch, which this film, quite rightfully, is constantly accused of being a ripoff of, was a real phenomenon which took place twenty years ago. To this day it was never really been explained, and while there are tons of individuals out there claiming to know what took place, it still remains a mystery to the general public. Also, some very interesting ideas regarding the Ancient Astronauts Mythos, with references to Merkabah or Ezekiel's wheel from the Old Testament actually providing some insight into the mystery later on in the "found footage" part of the movie when you find out what really happened to the three missing teenagers, Mark, Josh, and Ashley.

In addition to this, some potential for emotional depth and drama regarding the younger sister of Josh who went missing back in 97, regarding her current goal of attempting to find out what really happened to him by creating the "documentary" part of the film, also never amounts to very much. I understand this isn't some deep Hollywood drama about what the mental states of the friends and family of those unfortunate people who are never heard from again, but it could have been a lot more in-depth than it was without losing focus.

In the end however, it ultimately falls prey to far too many of the clichés and pitfalls which unfortunately plague almost every "found footage" horror movie these days, and yes, at times, it seems very reminiscent of an earlier film nowadays regarded as a classic, 1999's The Blair Witch Project. A real shame because for quite a while towards the end when it finally shows what happened to them, it was genuinely eerie and foreboding but then of course the ending itself manages to be one of the most anti-climactic I've ever seen. It was okay I guess, but falls far from greatness.

Reviewed by MisterWhiplash 6 / 10

better than you'd expect, though not without problems of its own

I'm not sure if Phoenix Forgotten marks, much more than even last year's "soft reboot/sequel" of Blair Witch, the "found footage" sub-type or genre of horror, the full circle of what it's been all about. The funny thing is that this is not entirely even found footage; it is actually, to go back further, indebted too to what Blair Witch was itself doing an homage to, Cannibal Holocaust, though that didn't pretend to be the documentary that this does. While we do get to see some of the footage shot in 1997 by the main woman's older brother sporadically in the first two thirds, we don't get the full, unfiltered "found" part of it until the last twenty minutes. And, whether it's because a lot has been built up beforehand with the characters, it's the best part of the movie.

I should note that this first two-thirds feels longer because some of the character build up is of the stock kind; the acting isn't that bad, certainly considering the low budget, but this all seems to go on for a long while. It almost puts the director Justin Barber into an uncomfortable position: he has to really have something that pays off for our patience, or else we're going to be quite mad (there was a large family sitting near me which had such an inclination at the end of the film, with one exclaiming, and I quote, "That s*** was ass!") Thankfully, it pays off just enough to be passable. Could it have been more, or a little less predictable? Of course, it almost always can be.

I do have to stress that this is probably a better movie than you're expecting while, simultaneously, being reasonable enough for a rental or even a Netflix viewing - not so much for a movie theater screen where, indeed, much of what we see isn't so cinematic as to warrant a giant screen experience. What stands out is that the performances are by people who are trying (and the writing is trying for them too, at least up to a point, the actress, Chelsea Lopez I think, on the poster is the example of that), and the director and his team make some clever motions to bringing alien invasion into the found-footage horror style.

So the special effects are all seamlessly done in the frame of what *is* a shot-on-90's-consumer-grade camcorder. There isn't anything in the present day, so everything in the past has to work. As far as capturing that rough-edged 90's approach technically speaking, and getting us to believe it, they do a competent job. If anything if the whole movie had been *more* in the 90's style - say, if they found rolls and rolls of tapes and that's all they had to go on, no present-day interviews with boiler-plate answers from the parents and experts and journalists - it'd be even more appealing.

Reviewed by Zbigniew_Krycsiwiki 3 / 10

For the second time in one week, I was the only person in the cinema.

" Based on shocking(?) Untold True Events(??) "

The events are about as shocking as stale popcorn, the story was untold because the screenwriters have just recently written it, and the events are about as true as can be expected from a found footage flick, especially in this day and age. 

They seven years anniversary of 1997's Phoenix lights sighting had already passed, so had ten years anniversary, so the filmmakers decided to drop this wholly predictable and formulaic, barely feature length, eighty- minutes long hybrid of 1999's Blair Witch, 2016's Blair Witch, and a generic X Files/ alien visitation plot into cinemas on the next clichéd, hyperbolic anniversary. They shouldn't have bothered.

The derivative plot involves the search for teenagers who disappeared during the 13 March 1997 sighting of unidentified lights above Phoenix, Arizona, after their video camera is found, documenting their final moments, for no other reason than so it can be used in a found footage flick.

In addition to being one of the least ambitious films in recent memory, the trailer tells shows most of what is in store here, including telling us the teens were supposedly never seen again, so the final outcome holds zero suspense. There's so little to say about this movie, because there's so little substance to it. While admittedly, it isn't * terrible *, it also isn't worth watching, either.

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